Alexis Wright

Alexis Wright is a member of the Waanyi nation of the southern highlands of the Gulf of Carpentaria. Her first novel Plains of Promise was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Prize and published in France as Les Plaines de L’Espoir. She is the author of the novel Carpentaria, which won five national literary awards in 2007, including the ASAL Gold Medal and the Miles Franklin Award. As her next book set into the future, The Swan Book was also award-winning, and the short story collection Le Pacte de Serpent.

She has written widely on Indigenous rights, and organised two successful Indigenous Constitutional Conventions, ‘Today We Talk About Tomorrow’ (1993), and the Kalkaringi Convention (1998).

Wright has also published works of non-fiction: Take Power, as editor of an oral history and collection of essays celebrating twenty years of land rights for the Central Land Council in Central Australia; Grog War, a study of alcohol abuse in the Northern Territory; and Tracker, a collective memoir of Aboriginal leader, Tracker Tilmouth, which won the 2018 Stella Award.

Her books have been published widely overseas, including in China, the US, the UK, Italy, France and Poland. She was recently named the Boisbouvier Chair in Australian Literature at the University of Melbourne. Wright is the only author to win both the Miles Franklin Award (in 2007 for Carpentaria) and the Stella Prize (in 2018 for Tracker).

“Wright’s storytelling is operatic and surreal: a blend of myth and scripture, farce and politics.” 

SESSION/S:

COLIN RODERICK MEMORIAL LECTURE
Alexis Wright in conversation with Roger Osborne (JCU)

FRI 10, 6.00 pm – 8.30 pm

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FREE

SESSION/S:

TRACKER
Alexis Wright interviewed by Sonja Anderson (CQU)

SAT 11, 4.15 pm – 5.00 pm

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ENTRY with Weekend Pass

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Alexis Wright’s visit to Cairns Tropical Writers Festival is supported by the Association for the Study of Australian Literature (ASAL) and the Australian Copyright Council, the Foundation for Australian Literary Studies (FALS), and the Office of Indigenous Engagement at Central Queensland University (CQU).

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